The Importance of Staying Well Hydrated

Dehydration can be a serious condition. Did you know every single cell in your body needs water in order to function properly? As a company that installs water softeners in Castle Rock, we understand just how important water is for everyone. Here are a few common myths about water and dehydration. Read on for information about how to stay well-hydrated!

Myth #1: Dehydration isn’t a big deal.

The first symptoms of dehydration include a headache and sluggishness. The more serious symptoms include kidney failure, seizures, swelling of the brain and worse. The good news is dehydration is easily treated. Just make sure you sip some extra water and if it’s hot out and you’re sweating, make sure you sip even more water to replace the fluids you’re losing.

Myth #2: Thirst is a sign you’re dehydrated.

Actually, thirst is just your body’s way of reminding you to drink water. So if you’re in tune with your body, knowing when you need a drink of water is something that is automatic.

Myth #3: Drink at least eight glasses of water every day.

Some recommendations say you should drink water when you’re thirsty. Others say that men should get about three liters a day and women should get about 2.2 liters. Either way, your water intake can come in many forms. For example, tea and fruit juice can count toward this intake, as can certain fruits and vegetables.

Myth #4: You can’t drink too much water.

While over-hydrating is rare, it can happen. It is a condition known as “hyponatremia.” What happens is the sodium in your body gets dangerously diluted and then your cells begin to swell. Warning signs include headaches, confusion, nausea and vomiting, fatigue and more. This can be a fatal condition. But it takes a great deal of water to get to this point.

If you want more information about water softeners in Castle Rock, call Haferman Water Conditioning at 952-894-4040 or contact us for a Free Water Analysis and Estimate.

This blog is for entertainment purposes only and is not providing valid medical advice. If you have any questions about dehydration or any other medical issues, please contact your physician.

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